Occipital lobe


The occipital lobe lies caudal to the parieto-occipital sulcus, which joins the calcarine sulcus in a Y-shaped formation.
external image occipital.jpg
Cortex on both banks of the calcarine sulcus constitutes the primary visual area, which receives input from the contralateral visual field via the optic radiation. The visual field is represented near the calcarine sulcus in a retinotopic fashion—that is, with upper quadrants of the visual field laid out along the inferior bank of the sulcus and lower quadrants of the visual field represented on the upper bank. Central vision is represented mostly caudally and peripheral vision rostrally.
Not visible from the surface of the cerebrum is the insular

The occipital lobe is the visual processing center of the mammalian brain containing most of the anatomical region of the visual cortex. The primary visual cortex is Brodmann area 17, commonly called V1 Human V1 is located on the medial side of the occipital lobe within the calcarine sulcus; the full extent of V1 often continues onto the posterior pole of the occipital lobe. V1 is often also called striate cortex because it can be identified by a large stripe of myelin, the Stria of Gennari. Visually driven regions outside V1 are called extrastriate cortex. There are many extrastriate regions, and these are specialized for different visual tasks, such as visuospatial processing, color discrimination and motion perception.

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Occipital Lobe Quiz


Sources
http://school.eb.com/eb/article-75531?query=frontal%20lobes&ct
http://www.qwiki.com/q/#!/Occipital_lobe